Article

Cannabidiol does not display drug abuse potential in mice behavior

Authors: Adrián Viudez-Martínez, María S. García-Gutiérrez, Juan Medrano-Relinque, Carmen M. Navarrón, Francisco Navarrete, Jorge Manzanares
DOI: 10.1038/s41401-018-0032-8
Received: 18 December 2017
Accepted: 20 April 2018
Advance online: 18 July 2018

Abstract

Recent evidence suggests that cannabidiol (CBD) may be useful for the treatment of different neuropsychiatric disorders. However, some controversy regarding its profile as a drug of abuse hampers the further development of basic and clinical studies. In this study, the behavioral profile of CBD as a potential drug of abuse was evaluated in C57BL/6J mice. Reinforcing properties of CBD (15, 30, and 60 mg/kg; i.p.) were assessed using the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm. Spontaneous withdrawal symptoms and motor activity in the open field were examined 12 h after the last CBD administration (30 mg/kg/12 h, i.p., 6 days). CBD plasma concentrations were measured at 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h after the administration of CBD (30 mg/kg, i.p.). Furthermore, an oral CBD selfadministration paradigm (50 mg/kg; CBD water-soluble 1.2 mg/mL) was performed to evaluate whether this drug produced any effects on motivation compared with a non-reinforcing substance (water). We found that CBD failed to induce CPP, withdrawal symptoms, or altered motor behavior 12 h after its administration. At that time, only traces of CBD were detected, ensuring that the lack of alterations in somatic signs and locomotor activity was not due to residual drug in plasma. Interestingly, mice displayed similar motivation and consumption of CBD and water. Taken together, these results show that CBD lacks activity as a drug of abuse and should stimulate the development of the basic and clinical studies needed to elucidate its potential therapeutic use for the treatment of neuropsychiatric and drug use disorders.
Keywords: cannabidiol; cannabinoid receptor; drug abuse; conditioned place preference; oral CBD self-administration; withdrawal syndrome

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